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Dillonvale targets electric fences

January 6, 2009
Times Leader

DILLONVALE - Ordinances which would prohibit electric fences and non-domestic animals within the village of Dillonvale are under consideration by Dillonvale Village Council.

First readings recently were given to the two ordinances, one of which would prohibit the construction and/or maintenance of any fence charged with electrical current in the village. The other would prohibit the harboring of non-domestic animals within the village.

Before the ordinances are adopted, two other readings will be necessary or they may be approved under suspension of rules.

Council apparently had a busy meeting as they adopted eight other ordinances under suspension of rules. These are:

In other matters, council renewed the contract with Tech Support Computer Service for 2009. This contract is for utility computer equipment at the yearly rate of $600.

It was reported that the next event, planned by the state auditor about certified public records training, will be held Jan. 13 in Sugarcreek. This training is free of charge and fulfills the mandatory public records training requirement for all elected officials to attend during each term of office.

The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, which conducted an evaluation survey of Dillonvale's public water system, has recommended that security lighting be installed at all finished water storage facilities. The water superintendent contacted AEP and obtained rates for all three areas.

Mayor Bill Morse reported two front tires have been been purchased for the white cruiser, and a police department pistol was repaired. The gun was still under warranty.

The mayor's court report showed a total of $1,205 with $885 going to the village, $80 to the computer fund, $212 to the state and $28 to public safety.

Temporary appropriations in the amount of $147,703 for the first three months in 2009 were approved.

Reporting on a Jefferson County Regional Planning Commission meeting, Councilman Rich Gatchel said Mount Pleasant had been granted an extension for Community Development Block Grant funds for the school building.

The problem of road salt availability was pointed out by Morse, and the village is using salt and cinders. This combination has created a problem, and the mayor went up Hill Street and removed as much as he could with his tractor. The Buckeye Local School District has offered a broom to the village, but officials said this won't solve the problem.

Morse asked council to think of solutions to clean up the sand and cinders from the streets after snow storms.

A resident who has been in the process of selling a house told officials the property was surveyed, and it was learned that portion of the house and garage are on property unknown, but it was later found out they are on a village street. The house is a century old.

The resident turned over maps and a letter from her attorney, who suggested the woman contact village officials about the possibility of vacating part of the street. Morse said the information would be turned over to the village solicitor for his recommendation.

Council indicated it does not have a problem of turning over the property to the resident upon the solicitor's recommendation. At this point, the resident can't sell the property.

 
 

 

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