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Senior services adapting to changing generations

May 20, 2009
Times Leader
By MIKE?PALMER
Times Leader Staff Writer

    THE?FACE of seniors citizens is changing as the greatest generation gives way to the new crop of retiring baby boomers. This was illustrated by the theme of the recent countywide event sponsored by Belmont Senior Services titled “Through the Years.”
    The challenge of serving the younger senior citizens as well as the very old, is something senior citizen centers are facing as baby boomers begin to retire. For that reason, local providers are looking at ways to better serve people whose ages span a half century -- from 50-plus to those who have reached the 100 year milestone.
    Tim Johnson, Director of the Belmont Senior Services explained, “We have a whole new generation retiring and as that happens we have to change our services to adapt to a different type of senior citizens.” Johnson said, “The World War II and Korean War era seniors were happy with playing cards and bingo but that is not going to satisfy the seniors from the Rock and Roll era.”
    The ‘Through the Years’ theme is representative of the theme that all of the agencies that deal with aging are currently facing, “The Colerain Center is an appropriate venue for this activity,” Johnson commented, “There are ten centers and they all have their own personalities, the Colerain Center has always been oriented towards the arts and music.”
    The entertainment for this year’s dance and dinner was provided by Dave Milovac and Becky Goudy. Along with the entertainment there was a style show featuring seniors from around the county and dinner was provided. Punch was served by Mary Harrison.
    “While this is a good fit for our current seniors,” said Johnson, “The next generation of senior citizens might be trading bingo daubers and playing cards for Nintendo Wii and Zumba.”
    “The seniors of today aren't what our parents were," says Johnson, "They're not content to sit at home and go play bingo out a few nights a week.”
    “The numbers inside local senior centers are dropping in some areas, in part due to their stereotypical image”, said Johnson, Women and men who have spent their lives in the working world are looking for physical activity, intellectual stimulation, travel groups and classes that range from pottery and crafts to yoga and hiking.
    That type of activity is what is driving the need for a senior center that "is not your father's Studabaker," Johnson says. "It's a whole different mindset and mentality toward the aging process. I see it only growing and becoming bigger and better.”
    Palmer can be reached at: mpalmer@timesleaderonline.com

   
 

 

 

 

 

 By MIKE?PALMER
Times Leader Staff Writer

    THE?FACE of seniors citizens is changing as the greatest generation gives way to the new crop of retiring baby boomers. This was illustrated by the theme of the recent countywide event sponsored by Belmont Senior Services titled “Through the Years.”
    The challenge of serving the younger senior citizens as well as the very old, is something senior citizen centers are facing as baby boomers begin to retire. For that reason, local providers are looking at ways to better serve people whose ages span a half century -- from 50-plus to those who have reached the 100 year milestone.
    Tim Johnson, Director of the Belmont Senior Services explained, “We have a whole new generation retiring and as that happens we have to change our services to adapt to a different type of senior citizens.” Johnson said, “The World War II and Korean War era seniors were happy with playing cards and bingo but that is not going to satisfy the seniors from the Rock and Roll era.”
    The ‘Through the Years’ theme is representative of the theme that all of the agencies that deal with aging are currently facing, “The Colerain Center is an appropriate venue for this activity,” Johnson commented, “There are ten centers and they all have their own personalities, the Colerain Center has always been oriented towards the arts and music.”
    The entertainment for this year’s dance and dinner was provided by Dave Milovac and Becky Goudy. Along with the entertainment there was a style show featuring seniors from around the county and dinner was provided. Punch was served by Mary Harrison.
    “While this is a good fit for our current seniors,” said Johnson, “The next generation of senior citizens might be trading bingo daubers and playing cards for Nintendo Wii and Zumba.”
    “The seniors of today aren't what our parents were," says Johnson, "They're not content to sit at home and go play bingo out a few nights a week.”
    “The numbers inside local senior centers are dropping in some areas, in part due to their stereotypical image”, said Johnson, Women and men who have spent their lives in the working world are looking for physical activity, intellectual stimulation, travel groups and classes that range from pottery and crafts to yoga and hiking.
    That type of activity is what is driving the need for a senior center that "is not your father's Studabaker," Johnson says. "It's a whole different mindset and mentality toward the aging process. I see it only growing and becoming bigger and better.”
    Palmer can be reached at: mpalmer@timesleaderonline.com

   
 

 

 

 

 

 

Article Photos

T-L Photos/ERIC?AYERS
DAVE MILOVAC provided musical entertainment during the Belmont Senior Services “Through the Years” event at the Colerain Senior Center. The event was a collaboration of all the county’s senior centers. Visit cu.timesleaderonline.com

 
 

 

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