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Statehouse Bar

August 26, 2011
Times Leader

THE BUCKEYE State has some notable firsts such as an Ohioan being the first person on the moon, but another first recently proposed isn't so "lofty."

In other words, if the first under consideration comes to fruition, it won't be anything to brag about.

The Associated Press reported that state officials are debating a proposal "to establish what would apparently be the nation's first statehouse bar - a venue where lawmakers and even members of the public could tip a few back after hours if they reserve the space."

Varying reports have surfaced about liquor in the Statehouse, but it appears the proposal has been slowed by the panel that oversees Statehouse operations, and a study committee will consider what could be offered at the Capitol Cafe in the basement, according to AP.

That news service also reports the cafe operator said the bar would not have been open to the public.

The Los Angeles Times, according to a Web site, on the following day quoted a Capitol Square Review and Advisory Board spokesman as noting that it's not a traditional bar that's open to the public.

That newspaper went on to say that the cafe operator did propose holding public happy hours, and a committee set up by the board recommended against that, but "the recommendation will come before the board in October."

REGARDLESS of the varied reports, it's obvious that liquor currently isn't available to lawmakers in the basement.

Why should it be? The Statehouse is a place to make laws - not drinks.

Anyone interested in an alcoholic drink surely could find a bar in Columbus to quench their thirst. After all, the Statehouse is located at the corner of Broad and High streets.

With its Greek Revival Doric architecture, the Statehouse is a place of elegance and dignity. Schoolchildren and adults on tours through the structure may view sights such as a marble bust of Abraham Lincoln, the only one for which he posed during his lifetime.

Sometimes known as "The People's House," the Statehouse's Sesquicentennial is being celebrated this year.

To add liquor for legislators and possibly others would be nothing to celebrate.

 
 

 

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