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Shadyside celebrates 100th birthday

September 17, 2012
KAYLA VAN DYNE - Staff Writer , Times Leader

SHADYSIDE - The village of Shadyside came alive this weekend as it celebrated its 100th anniversary in a centennial event that included a parade, car show and music.

The festivities began Friday and continued Saturday at 2 p.m. as the parade flooded down the main drag of Shadyside, complete with old cars that later appeared in the car show.

The marching band, majorettes and cheerleaders, along with several local businesses and those running for office in Belmont County, waved to the crowds of people and passed out candy and pamphlets.

Article Photos

Pictured is the cover wagon that gave rides to the citizens of Shadyside that came out for Sunday’s Centennial celebration.

Residents gathered for a community social at the basketball courts where food wassold. T-shirts were sold to support many of the local sports teams and churches sold baked goods.

"I want to thank the city council and all the citizens that helped plan this celebration," said Shadyside's Mayor Bob Newhart, who could be seen leading the parade in a police car, passing out candy. "We were blessed with a beautiful day and a great turn out. This is a great community event."

The community band filled the air with music from 100 years ago, as children were given rides on a miniature locomotive decked out in red, white and blue. A covered wagon also gave children and adults rides. Both were free to the public.

While Mayor Newhart gave his welcome speech, which thanked all those involved, others could be found inside the community building, viewing the exhibits of the OR&W railroads.

The exhibits included pictures, maps and several men and women dressed up in clothes from a century ago. Railroad historian Bill Logan spoke of the railroad's history, giving all who listened a glimpse into the past.

It's because of the railroads, that Shadyside received its name, when a resident planted trees that boarded his land and hung a sign that said "Shadyside." Later, "Shadyside" on the railroad that became known as the Shadyside Station.

The name, along with the history has stuck with the small Ohio town, and will probably stick for another 100 years.

Van Dyne may be reached at kvandyne@timesleaderonline.com

 
 

 

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